Posts Tagged ‘chandra’

Two Merging Blackholes Pictured

October 9, 2009

This is time for the next cool picture, guys! Below is a composite picture of two merging black holes captured by Hubble and Chandra. All red and yellow colors are from Chandra picture and bluish colors are from Hubble. Isn’t it amazing how people just 50 years ago were not sure if black holes exist and now we are looking at the picture how two of them collide?

Composite images of two colliding black holes. Click for a bigger version. Image credit: Chandra, Hubble

Composite images of two colliding black holes. Click for a bigger version. Image credit: Chandra, Hubble

Star Formation Pictured by Chandra and Spitzer

August 14, 2009

Astronomy pictures becoming better and better. While Hubble still holds the first place for delivered beauty of Universe, new telescopes are getting closer. Look at this one — composite image of star formation region taken by Chandra and Spitzer and combined for us to enjoy:

star formation region picture

Star formation region pictured by Chandra and Spitzer and combined. Click to enlarge. Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/PSU/K. Getman et al.; IRL NASA/JPL-Caltech/CfA/J. Wang et al.

This cloud you see consists of molecular hydrogen and scientists believe that it’s compressed by the powerful star radiation. When hydrogen compresses, temperature rises and stars are born. All those violet gems you see on the picture — very young stars originated form the same hydrogen cloud. And many of them have protoplanetary discs which will develop into planets later.

Chandra site has interactive image where you can see X-Ray part separately from infrared.

Compare Supernova Pictures

July 23, 2009

Some people may wonder, why do we bother with X-Ray observatories and infrared observatories. We can not see those electromagnetic waves with our eyes, what’s the point to shoot pictures in them, we have to use fake colors to view such pictures. Below are the two photos for you to compare. First one is taken by Hubble, second one is combination of Hubble photo and X-Ray photo taken by Chandra.

1E0102 Supernova pictured by Hubble Space Telescope in visible light. Image credit: HST

1E0102 Supernova pictured by Hubble Space Telescope in visible light. Click for bigger version. Image credit: HST

Same supernova composite Chandra and Hubble picture. Thanks to X-Ray we can see much more details. Click for slightly bigger version. Image credit: NASA

Same supernova composite Chandra and Hubble picture. Thanks to X-Ray we can see much more details. Click for slightly bigger version. Image credit: NASA

The truth is, in nature there is no actual difference between visible light and X-Ray or infrared or radio waves. It is all the same phenomenon, it’s just happened the way that we see visible light with our eyes, so it makes visible light kind of special for us, humans. Do you want to know why we see exactly visible light? Wait for my next post.